South Carolina

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Settled by the English in 1670, South Carolina became the eighth state to ratify the U.S. constitution in 1788. Its early economy was largely agricultural, benefitting from the area’s fertile soil, and plantation farmers relied on the slave trade for cheap labor to maximize their profits. By 1730, people of African descent made up two thirds of the colony’s population. South Carolina became the first state to secede from the union in 1861, and was the site of the first shots of the Civil War–the shelling of the federally held Fort Sumter by Confederate troops on April 12, 1861. Today, South Carolina coastline near Myrtle Beach has developed into one of the premiere resort destinations on the East Coast, and has over 100 golf courses. Famous South Carolinians include musicians James Brown, Chubby Checker and Dizzy Gillespie, novelist Pat Conroy, boxer Joe Frazier, tennis champion Althea Gibson, politician Jesse Jackson and long-serving U.S. Senator Strom Thurmond.
William Harvey House, Charleston, South CarolinaWilliam Harvey HouseCharleston, South CarolinaPrivate residence built in 1728 by William Harvey. This house was leased 1750 by his Excellency James Glenn, Governor of the Province until...86 Broad St, Charleston, South Carolina86 Broad StCharleston, South CarolinaThis building, erected in the post-revolutionary period on a part of the land once known as Archdale's Square, was occupied by the Charleston...Major Peter Bocquet's House, Charleston, South CarolinaMajor Peter Bocquet's HouseCharleston, South CarolinaPeter Bouquet the Younger built this house shortly after the lot was given to him in July 1770, by his father Peter Bouquet, the senior, a Huguenot...County of Charleston Historic Courthouse, Charleston, South CarolinaCounty of Charleston Historic CourthouseCharleston, South CarolinaIt was originally built in 1753 as a Statehouse of British Royal Government. It was partially destroyed by fire in 1788 and rebuilt in 1792 with a...Waterfront Park, Charleston, South CarolinaWaterfront ParkCharleston, South CarolinaThis is one of the most photogenic fountains in the city and is probably in nearly every other pamphlet or tourist magazine, however it is much...Charleston Office of Cultural Affairs, Charleston, South CarolinaCharleston Office of Cultural AffairsCharleston, South CarolinaThis is a free public art gallery that sits just across a small green lawn from the beautiful pineapple fountain. The pieces are absolutely...25 Meeting St., Charleston, South Carolina25 Meeting St.Charleston, South CarolinaA three and one-half story stuccoed brick single house, this is believed to have been built c. 1750 by William Hull.23 Meeting St., Charleston, South Carolina23 Meeting St.Charleston, South CarolinaThis three and one-half story single house is believed to have been built c. 1750 by Albert Detmar.Thomas Lamboll House B&B, Charleston, South CarolinaThomas Lamboll House B&BCharleston, South CarolinaThis Georgian style residence, attributed to architect and master builder Thomas Lee, was built for colonial judge Thomas Lamboll c.1739. The...The Edgar Wells House, Charleston, South CarolinaThe Edgar Wells HouseCharleston, South CarolinaIn the 1780's, it was owned and occupied by Dr. George Hahnbaum, physician to the German fusiliers and later a founder of the Medical Society of...2 Meeting St, Charleston, South Carolina2 Meeting StCharleston, South CarolinaThis outstanding Queen Anne style house was built in 1892 for Waring P. Carrington and his wife, Martha, a daughter of George W. Williams, the...Thomas Heyward House, Charleston, South CarolinaThomas Heyward HouseCharleston, South CarolinaThis three story brick house was built by Nathaniel Heyward before 1803 or by his brother Thomas Heyward (signer of the Declaration of...Ingraham-Forrest House, Charleston, South CarolinaIngraham-Forrest HouseCharleston, South CarolinaThe Nathaniel Ingraham family owned this property for close to fifty years. Nathaniel Ingraham, originally from Boston, was a naval captain during...William Elliott House, Charleston, South CarolinaWilliam Elliott HouseCharleston, South CarolinaWilliam Elliott, whose distinguished family began here as a "brotherhood of builders," appears to have had this house constructed sometime before...The Samuel Wainright House, Charleston, South CarolinaThe Samuel Wainright HouseCharleston, South CarolinaThis advertisement appeared in the S.C. Gazette on 6th Jan., 1784, following Mr. Wainwright's death "On WEDNESDAY the 28th of JANUARY inft. WILL BE...15 Meeting St., Charleston, South Carolina15 Meeting St.Charleston, South CarolinaJohn Edwards is said to have built and moved into this house in 1770. He was a member of Rutledge's Privy Council in 1779, and took an active part...James Brown House, Charleston, South CarolinaJames Brown HouseCharleston, South CarolinaThe James Brown House is situated on a portion of Lot Number 82 of the Grand Modell, the city plan for Charleston that was developed in 1670. The...27 Meeting St, Charleston, South Carolina27 Meeting StCharleston, South CarolinaThis three story stuccoed brick house on high brick basement is presumed to have been built after the Revolution. The cast iron gates to the yard...The Benjamin DuPré House, Charleston, South CarolinaThe Benjamin DuPré HouseCharleston, South CarolinaThis significant single house was built by Benjamin DuPré, a French tailor, sometime after 1803. The entire area was known as “Gadsden’s Green”...The Moses C. Levy House, Charleston, South CarolinaThe Moses C. Levy HouseCharleston, South CarolinaMoses C. Levy, a Polish born King Street merchant, built this valuable Federal style single house between 1811 and 1816. The house is located on...
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